bail bonds in san marcos Tag

Every single year, approximately 7.5 million Americans become the victims of a stalker. If you suspect that you’ve attracted the attention of a stalker you must remain calm while simultaneously...

Parenting is rarely an easy task at the best of times. When times get tough, like they have recently, parenting can get even tougher. With schools shut down all over the country, many parents have suddenly been reminded of just how tough parenting is. This is only made worse when some parents are still working, meaning their kids have to be left home alone. Parents of younger kids can be left in a very tough spot. They need to work, but they also need to keep an eye on their children at home. They worry that their children may not be old enough to be left home alone. Then they wonder at what age a child can legally be left home alone in California.

It Depends on the Child

Deciding to leave a child home alone is not an easy decision to make. Most parents spend hours agonizing over that decision the first time. They may search online for answers, but unfortunately, there is no easy answer to this question. The one nice thing is that there is no law here in the state of California that states when a child can be left home alone. When it comes to leaving a child home alone, things vary from kid to kid. This is one of the main reasons why the state doesn't set an age limit to when a child can be left home alone. Some kids mature faster than others, and so an 8-year-old may be ready to take care of herself for an hour or two while a 9-year-old may still need constant supervision. The state can't make exact guidelines for this kind of thing and so refer to the parent's expertise on their child. To help parents make a truly informed and well thought out decision, the state does provide parents with a list of questions to ask themselves regarding their child on the California Department of Education's website. These questions include:
  • Can he creatively solve problems?
  • Do you live in an isolated area without close neighbors?
  • Does he always let you know where he is going and when he will return?
  • Does your child become bored easily?
  • Is a neighbor home to help if needed?
  • Is he easily frightened?
  • Is she responsible?
  • Is your neighborhood safe?
  • Will you or another adult always be available to your child in case of an emergency?
  • Would caring for the younger sibling restrict the older child’s activities?
  • Would she be at home with an older brother or sister? Do siblings get along?
  • Would she spend her time responsibly?
  • Would the older sibling resent caring for the younger one?
  • Would your child rather stay home than go to a child care or after-school program?
When people are looking to move, they always want to make sure that the place they are moving to is safe. Figuring out if a particular city is safe or not requires a lot of work, more than the average individual can do on their own, and that’s just for one city. If a person wants to compare the safety of multiple cities, they need to look at a professionally done study.

If you haven’t been in a car accident yet, you should consider yourself lucky. Considering how much time we spend behind the wheel, the odds are good that sooner...

One of the more confusing criminal charges California has is the accessory after the fact. Many people don’t know that it’s possible to get into trouble for a crime that they weren’t involved with until well after the crime happened. California law stipulates that anyone who basically takes steps to hinder a criminal investigation could be charged with accessory after the fact. This means that if you help or conceal a loved one who has committed a crime, you will likely find yourself in hot legal water. An accessory after the fact charge isn’t something you should joke about. It’s a felony that comes with a potential sentencing that includes a three-year stay in one of California’s state prisons. Accessory after the fact charges are touched on in California’s Penal Code 32 (PC). It states that:
    “Every person who, after a felony has been committed, harbors, conceals or aids a principal in such felony, with the intent that said principal may avoid or escape from arrest, trial, conviction or punishment, having knowledge that said the principal has committed such felony or has been charged with such felony or convicted thereof, is an accessory to such felony.”

Accessory After the Fact Crimes

What the laws doesn’t get into is how serious a charge is or how to prepare to defend yourself against the charge. Examples of things that could result in your being charged with an accessory of the fact include:
  • Giving a person of interest a ride so they can evade law enforcement
  • Providing a person of interest with a place to stay and failing to let the authorities know
  • Giving someone money so they can run from criminal charges
  • Knowing that someone has committed a crime and failing to tell the police
Bait and switch is a cute term that refers to a nasty con game. If you’re the victim of a bait and switch scam you’ve purchased one item only to be given something that doesn’t match the description of what you purchased. Bait and switch typically involve businesses who use the tactic to lure customers in by advertising a great product at a fantastic price only to provide something that’s quite different.

Identifying That you Were a Victim of Bait and Switch

The FTC has done an excellent job of creating guidelines that clarify when a “bait and switch” situation has happened. According to the FTC, you weren’t a victim of a bait and switch con if you:
  • Were convinced to buy something different
  • If the seller simply runs out of whatever item they were promoting, especially when the business clearly stated that they only had limited quantities of the promoted item
  • The only way you are a true victim of bait and switch is when the seller clearly had no intention of selling the promoted product.
Most of us have watched enough procedural shows to know that bail is what you pay to be sprung from jail while you wait for your case to make its way to court. Most of us also know that a bail bond agency, like San Marcos Bail Bonds, is a business that helps you cover the cost of your bail. In most situations, that’s is where our knowledge ends. Very few people understand that before we can help bail you out of jail you’ll have to sign a bail agreement. If you’re wondering what a bail agreement is, you’re not alone. It is seldom explained properly. The bail agreement is a surprisingly simple contract that serves as a binding legal document between you, the Indemnitor, and us, the bail bond agency that wants to help you reunite with your loved ones. The agreement is very clear. Every single aspect of our relationship is carefully spelled out. The bail agreement discusses the terms of your bail, serves as an agreement that you’ll attend all of your mandatory court dates and lays out the bail payment plan we agree on. We feel that it’s important that you understand you don’t have to sign the bail agreement right away. Take as much time as you need to review the information and decide if we’re your best option. We don’t want you to do anything you’ll regret. When you sign our bail agreement, we want you to understand what you’re getting into. We encourage you to not only take our time and carefully read over the agreement but to also come to us with any questions. Our willingness to discuss every single aspect of our bail bond agreement is just one of the perks you’ll enjoy when you turn to San Marcos Bail Bonds for help with your bail situations. We’re renowned throughout California for our excellent service which includes:
  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • Free consultations
  • No hidden fees
  • No collateral required for working signers
  • Habla Espanol

You Can Request To Have Your Bail Reduced! The Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution protects arrested individuals against excessive bail. This means that their bail amount cannot be astronomically...