San Marcos Bail Bonds

Drunk driving is always bad, but getting caught driving while under the influence of alcohol while using a friend’s car, things become even more complicated. If you were simply pulled over,...

Every parent who has an infant knows that they’re supposed to have a car seat installed in their vehicle. They even know that it’s state law. What some parents don’t know is how important the car seat is and the consequences of having a car seat that doesn’t meet current safety standards, that isn’t properly installed, or that isn’t properly fitted to their child. According to Car Buyers Guide, "in a recent study, the RSA inspected 5000 child seat installations from the public and found that over 4000 of them needed adjustments of some kind to ensure optimum safety." California’s lawmakers used Vehicle Code 27360 VC to address the issue of car seats. The law clearly states that:
  • Children under the age of 2 must be properly restrained in a rear-facing car seat
  • Children under the age of 8 must ride in the back seat and be safely restrained in an age/size appropriate safety seat.
  • The child must be secured into the safety car seat in a manner that complies with both height and weight limits that are to be specified by the car seat manufacturer.

Identity theft is a serious problem that shows no signs of going away. The FTC reported that identity theft increased by a staggering 45% in 2020. Javelin Strategy announced that...

The purpose of the proposed Proposition 47 is to make some changes to felony sentencing laws. Proposition 47 officially became law in 2014. At the time it had the distinction of being one of the biggest changes to laws to alter the ability for convicted felons to receive housing, admittance into the workforce, and other issues that had previously made it impossible for them to enjoy a quality life after they served their sentence. The way this was done was by taking non-violent felony convictions and turning them into misdemeanors. The hope was that by lowering the barriers convicted felons faced when they were released from prison, they would be better able to become a useful member of society and be less likely to return to a life of crime. When Proposition 47 became law, it was estimated that over 1 million people living in California would be able to change their non-violent felony conviction records into more socially acceptable misdemeanors. The three broad changes the passing of Proposition 47 triggered included.
  • Turning some nonviolent theft and drug laws from felonies into misdemeanors
  • Allowing anyone currently serving time for a felony that could now be reclassifying to petition the court for a change of sentence
  • Allowing individuals who’d completed their sentence for a felony that was now considered a misdemeanor to change their criminal history

Keyless cars are great, particularly when you’re trying to hang onto things like multiple bags of groceries, cranky toddlers, and hyper pets while you open your car. Rather than...

Vandalism is a crime that’s often connected to some sort of strong emotion. An angry neighbor slashes a set of tires. An angry lover spray paints a crude message on an ex’s door. A disgruntled employee throws eggs at their boss’s vehicle. California lawmakers define vandalism as deliberately and maliciously damaging, destroying, or defacing property that belongs to another. The legalities of vandalism in California are addressed in California Penal Code 594 PC. It states:
    “(a) Every person who maliciously commits any of the following acts with respect to any real or personal property not his or her own, in cases other than those specified by state law, is guilty of vandalism:

As a parent, you constantly worry about whether you’re raising your child in a way that will enable them to be an independent, self-sufficient, responsible adult. You know that a...

No one who lives in California is ignorant of wildfires and the havoc they wreak. No matter what part of the state you live in, you should know how to...

If you’re caught wandering around a private property there’s a good chance that in addition to trespassing charges, you’ll also be charged with prowling. Prowling is dealt with in California’s Penal...

California lawmakers aren’t thrilled about fireworks and have created laws to restrict their use. The reason such tight fireworks laws exist in California stems from a few underlying concerns that...

The Fourth of July is one of those holidays when everyone likes to cut loose and really relax. Most of us get to enjoy a long weekend which means we tend to drink a little more than we normally would. The fact that many of us are hanging out with a large group of our close friends and family makes us even more likely to consume a little more alcohol than normal. There’s nothing wrong with using some adult-only beverages to help you unwind and enjoy the holiday, provided you do so in a manner that’s safe and legal. The first thing to make sure of before you pop the first top on your favorite brand of beer is that you are confident you won’t be getting behind the wheel and trying to drive somewhere. California lawmakers aren’t going to lighten up on the drunk driving consequences just because it’s a holiday. In fact, the holiday means that there will likely be even more police patrolling over the Fourth, increasing the odds of you getting caught and arrested for drunk driving. If you’re convicted of drunk driving in California over the Fourth of July:
  • You could spend anywhere from 96 hours to six months in a county jail
  • Pay a fine that ranges from $390-$1,000
  • Lose your driving privileges for six months

Hazing started as a fun way to prank some people while initiating others into a fraternity and sorority. The problem with hazing is that while it may have started as...

Yes, the Fast and the Furious movie franchise made street racing look like a great way of generating some excitement on a Friday night, but before you gather a group of your friend together to see who can drive the fastest, you should know that street racing, drag racing, and other vehicular speed contests aren’t legal on California’s public roads. They violate not one, but two of California’s laws: Vehicle Code 23103 VC (reckless driving) and Vehicle Code 23109 VC (speed contests). You must understand violating either of these California laws by speed racing on one of California’s public roads won’t result in a simple ticket. In most cases, you’ll find yourself facing misdemeanor charges. If you’re convicted, you’ll go through life with a criminal record and have to pay some extremely hefty fines. You may even spend some time inside a county jail cell. In order to secure a guilty conviction in a California street racing case, the prosecution must be able to prove that in addition to actually driving the car, you were also aware that you were street racing. You can’t be convicted of street racing if you simply happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time and got swept up in a street racing sting. You can be charged with street racing if you and another driver challenge one another to a race while sitting at a stoplight. In California, it only takes two people to create an illegal street racing situation. The first time you’re convicted of participating in a speed contest in California, your sentence can include:
  • A fine of up to $1,000
  • Spending as much as 90 days in jail