Bail Bond Blog & Articles

California lawmakers don’t care if you were simply bored and decided adding some graffiti to a church wall would make life more interesting, if you were angry and knocked over...

Bail is a great part of the American judicial system. Paying bail means you don’t have to stay in jail while you wait for the legal system to handle your case, a process that takes an incredibly long time. Since you can spend this time with your family and continue earning a living, you are less likely to take a poor plea agreement or to plead guilty to a crime you didn’t commit just so you can get out of jail. While most people know about bail, few actually understand how it works. One of the questions we’re frequently asked is what happens to a bail bond if the charges against you are dropped. There are several reasons the charges in your case may be dropped. These reasons include that the person who filed the charges has changed their mind or that as the prosecution started working on your case, they realized that they simply didn’t have enough evidence to put a solid case together. If you paid for your own bail also known as cash bail, once the charges are dropped you’ll get the entire amount you paid back. If you contacted San Marcos Bail Bonds and arranged for a bail bond from us, you won’t get any money back. The ten percent we collected when you first approached us about a bail bond is the fee we collect for helping you out of jail. The good news is that once the charges are dropped, you don’t have to worry about your bail. San Marcos Bail Bonds works with the court to get the bail money back and handles all the paperwork. You’re free to put the entire matter behind you and focus on your future. Not having to deal with any of the hassles of having to get the bail back after the charges have been dropped is just one of the reasons you should consider San Marcos Bail Bonds when you find yourself in need of bail in California. Additional reasons to turn to San Marcos Bail bonds include:
  • Flexible payment plans
  • Simple contracts
  • 24/7 service
  • Phone consultations
  • Online consultations
  • Zero worry about hidden fees
  • Zero down bail bond
  • Zero-interest bail bond
  • Fast service
  • Discretion

Finally! Halloween is here. Not only does that mean cooler weather, pumpkin spice coffee, and an excuse to snuggle up with a good book rather than going out, kids will...

The first time the term “road rage” was officially used was during the 80s when a team of broadcasters decided the term perfectly summed up the cause of a highway...

There are many great reasons to live in California. There’s also one huge drawback. In exchange for easy access to beaches and year-round wonderful weather, you always have to be...

The best way to think about hit and run incidents in California is that they are illegal. Fleeing the scene of an accident only makes the situation worse. A hit-and-run...

California lawmakers believe that the common citizen should be as protected from the police as possible. The creation of search and seizure laws is one of the steps lawmakers have...

When you think about it, you don’t often hear about pickpocketers these days. It’s not because pickpocketing is no longer a problem, but because crimes involving pickpocketers are either given...

California’s famous three strikes law was created in 1994 and received voter approval. The murder case of Polly Klaas and Kimber Reynolds was the catalyst for implementing the three-strikes law. Kimber...

A surprising number of people think that obstruction of justice is something the writers of procedural shows made up in order to correct plot holes. While it’s true, obstruction of justice is an overused plot device, it is also a real thing. If you live in California, there are a few things you should know about the state’s obstruction of justice laws. One of the interesting things about obstruction of justice in California is that the state doesn’t have a specific obstruction of justice crime. Instead, it’s a blanket term that’s used to describe a variety of offenses that are commonly referred to as California’s obstruction of justice laws. Official offenses that are considered forms of obstruction of justice include:
  • Destruction of evidence
  • Withholding evidence
  • Resisting arrest
  • Preparing false evidence
  • Providing a false statement
  • Hiding a witness/suspect
  • Interfering with an arrest
  • Lying to police officers
  • Failing to report a crime
  • Tampering with evidence
  • Intimidating/threatening a witness
Don’t assume that just because you didn’t actively participate in a burglary that the items taken during the burglary won’t get you into trouble. They likely will. It doesn’t really matter if you hold stolen items in your garage while your friend finds a fence, if you’re gifted a stolen television, or if you purchase stolen goods, if those items are found in your possession, you could find yourself facing a charge of receiving stolen property in California. The topic of receiving stolen property in California is dealt with in PC 496. It states that:
    “Every person who buys or receives any property that has been stolen or that has been obtained in any manner constituting theft or extortion, knowing the property to be so stolen or obtained, or who conceals, sells, withholds, or aids in concealing, selling, or withholding any property from the owner, knowing the property to be so stolen or obtained, shall be punished by imprisonment in a county jail for not more than one year, or imprisonment pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170.”
That sounds pretty serious, doesn’t it? It also sounds like you could be charged with receiving stolen property in California even if you knew nothing about the crime or the history of the items you’re purchasing or accepting as a gift. This is one of those situations where reading the law doesn’t really provide you with the full picture. Yes, if you purchase items that were involved in a robbery, you could be charged with receiving stolen goods in California, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be convicted. To secure a conviction the prosecutor has to prove two things. The first two are usually relatively easy for them to prove. They have to show that:
  • The items involved in your case really were stolen
  • That you received the stolen items in some manner

High-speed car chases happen all over the country, yet whenever people hear about a high-speed chase, they automatically assume it took place in California. That’s because California, and more specifically,...

Earbuds are awesome. They provide you with a way to tune out all the noise connected to the world and lose yourself in music, white noise, audiobooks, and podcasts. The...

GoFund Me has been a wonderful tool. It’s allowed people, non-profit organizations, and more to quickly raise money for important causes and emergencies. While many great things can be said...

Every single year, approximately 7.5 million Americans become the victims of a stalker. If you suspect that you’ve attracted the attention of a stalker you must remain calm while simultaneously...